Pages Menu
Categories Menu

Posted by

WhirlyBall | Fun for All Ages in Seattle

WhirlyBall | Fun for All Ages in Seattle

What happens when you cross bumper cars with lacrosse and basketball? You get WhirlyBall, of course! It’s easily some of the most fun we’ve ever had in Seattle. Here’s the gist about WhirlyBall: Teams are made up of five players apiece. Each player gets their own bumper car and “scoop” (like you use in Trac Ball). The goal is to toss a Wiffle Ball into an elevated basket; all while being bumped around by the opposition. Check out the video below to get a better understanding: Easily the most fun we’ve had in a long time! #WhirlyBall pic.twitter.com/jHNRCNsoXp — Seattle Bloggers (@SeattleBlgrs) January 8, 2017 When we played WhirlyBall, games lasted anywhere from 10 to 12 minutes. Depending on where you shoot from on the court, you get different sums of points for scoring. The team with the most points at the end wins. To add to the excitement, one of the WhirlyBall Seattle employees acts as the public address announcer, keeps score, and even calls penalties. It might sound...

Read More

Posted by

Talapus Lake | Winter Hike Near Seattle

Talapus Lake | Winter Hike Near Seattle

Seattle doesn’t typically get much snow in the winter, but the white stuff isn’t usually hard to find. Snoqualmie Pass is a short jaunt from the city, and it offers some snowy adventures, including this fun winter hike to Talapus Lake. The Talapus Lake trailhead (map) is about an hour drive from Seattle. After taking exit 45 off I-90, turn left, and then meander on forest roads to the trail. Road conditions can be questionable in the winter, so my best advice is checking the latest trip reports (bottom of the linked page) on the Washington Trails Association website. NOTE: There is a parking lot at the Talapus Lake trailhead, but it requires a Northwest Forest Pass. Winter wonderland today at Talapus Lake. pic.twitter.com/dM9h9A6TGI — Seattle Bloggers (@SeattleBlgrs) December 8, 2016 The winter hike to Talapus Lake (which can also be paired with Ollalie Lake) can be done as a hike (waterproof boots recommended) or with snowshoes. Either way, you climb about 900-feet in elevation and stomp a little...

Read More

Posted by

Bellevue Magic Season Ice Arena

Bellevue Magic Season Ice Arena

Tis’ the season — the Bellevue Magic Season Ice Arena that is! Celebrate the holidays with festive events running from November 25, 2016 through January 8, 2017. You can find the Bellevue Magic Season Ice Arena at Ashwood Park (map) next to the Bellevue Library. It’s the region’s largest open-air ice skating experience. With that said, the arena is covered so it’s open rain, shine, or snow. Admission to the Bellevue Magic Season Ice Arena is $12, but it’s $9 for kids 8-years-old and younger. The price includes skate rental. Cash, credit, and debit cards are accepted. No reservations or bookings are required or accepted during public hours. If you don’t want to pay for ice skating — there are Free Skate Mondays at the Bellevue Magic Season Ice Arena. All you have to do is show your Alaska Airlines Visa Signature card to receive two free skate admissions. There’s a limit of two tickets per person and it’s also limited to skate availability. There are many special events...

Read More

Posted by

Lodge Lake | Short Hike Near Snoqualmie Pass

Lodge Lake | Short Hike Near Snoqualmie Pass

There’s no shortage of hikes near Snoqualmie Pass. Some are pretty difficult, while others are nice and simple. The hike to Lodge Lake qualifies as the latter. It’s an easy three-mile stroll to a tranquil lake near the Snoqualmie Pass ski area, and it’s a hike not many people talk about. To get to the Lodge Lake trailhead (map), which is actually part of the Pacific Crest Trail, take I-90 to exit 52 (Snoqualmie Pass West). Take a right off the exit and another right into the ski area parking lot. Drive to the westernmost part of the lot, and you’ll find the Lodge Lake trailhead (marked as the Pacific Crest Trail). A Northwest Forest Pass is required. Honestly, the hike to Lodge Lake is a little unusual. As you come out of the woods at the start of the hike, you stroll onto the Snoqualmie Pass ski runs. While you’re surrounded by chairlifts, there’s actually a nice view back toward Guye Peak, Snoqualmie Mountain, and Red Mountain. NOTE:...

Read More

Posted by

Best Hikes Near Seattle

Best Hikes Near Seattle

Seattle is an incredible city. As far as we’re concerned, it’s the best place on the planet. With that said, Seattle is still a city. That means it’s nice to escape every once in a while. For us, there’s no better escape than a hike. If you’re like us and you’re always looking for a good trail, here’s our list of the best hikes near Seattle. NOTE: We should probably call this list the best hikes near Seattle that we’ve done. There are many popular hikes in the area we just haven’t gotten to yet. Mailbox Peak, Mount Si, and several others are on our to-do list. We’ve listed the best hikes near Seattle according to their distance from the city — shortest to farthest. There are no hikes on the list farther than 60 miles, so all can easily be done as part of a day trip or even half-day trip. For most of the following hikes, you can click on the name for more information. BEST HIKES...

Read More

Posted by

Lake Twenty Two | Strange Name, Beautiful Hike

Lake Twenty Two | Strange Name, Beautiful Hike

It has a unique — if not dull — name: Lake Twenty Two. And for that matter, there doesn’t seem to be any consistency with its name. You’ll see it written Lake Twenty Two, Lake Twenty-Two, Lake Twentytwo, and even Lake 22. With all the confusion about the name, there’s one overriding fact: Lake Twenty Two is beautiful! Before we delve into its strange name, let me first explain where Lake Twenty Two is. Located about an hour and a half from Seattle, the Lake Twenty Two trailhead is outside of Granite Falls on the Mountain Loop Highway. Click here for a map. As for the Lake Twenty Two name…I’ll let the Washington Trails Association explain: “The origin of Lake Twentytwo’s distinct name is uncertain, but a leading theory is that nineteenth-century railroad maps listed local creeks numerically; one particular creek and its source lake were assigned “22.” The name stuck, and in 1947 the 790-acre Lake Twenty Two Research Natural Area (RNA) was created, putting an end to...

Read More