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Our Norwegian Culinary Adventure

Our Norwegian Culinary Adventure

There is a lot we love about traveling: people, scenery, and of course food. Eating is one of our favorite ways to experience new places, including our recent trip to Norway. We enjoyed the culinary journey so much that Tove even wrote an article for America’s only Norwegian newspaper, The Norwegian American. Tove taking a break from fancy meals to enjoy pølse in Olso In the article, Tove shares our in-depth dining experiences from the beginning of our trip in Bergen to the end of our vacation in Oslo. And there’s even a shoutout to our favorite beer bar included. In other words, she has all the bases covered from food to drink. Click here to read Tove’s article Eating My Way Through Bergen and Oslo. The clear takeaway: Norway sets itself apart from other European countries for fresh seafood and vegetables. And Norwegians have great respect for the goods they catch, grow, forage, etc. It was a true pleasure to experience that first-hand and it left us only...

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Lisbon, Portugal | Best Things to See, Eat & Experience

Lisbon, Portugal | Best Things to See, Eat & Experience

We have traveled all over the world. But despite our dream to get there, Portugal somehow eluded us until recently. Tove and I spent our delayed honeymoon in Porto, and then continued our Portuguese adventure in Lisbon. In this post I am going to share the best things we saw, ate, did and even some we didn’t do in Lisbon. But they are all ideas we suggest to you. In brief summary, it’s a beautiful city with tons of character. We can’t wait to go back! Much like Porto, Lisbon is best enjoyed on foot. Be warned, though. There are quite a few hills. It’s actually easy to compare Lisbon to San Francisco in terms of topography (hills), character (trams), and even aesthetics (they have a bridge that looks similar to Golden Gate Bridge). The view from Eduardo VII Park One of the nicest strolls in Lisbon is along the tree-lined Avenida da Liberdade. Enjoy the view at the end from Eduardo VII Park (map). There are shops and...

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Neve Camp | North Cascades Backpacking

Neve Camp | North Cascades Backpacking

Over the river and through the woods to Neve Camp we go! Located just 2.5 miles down Thunder Creek trail in North Cascades National Park, Neve Camp (pronounced nev-AY) is a backcountry backpacking adventure that doesn’t require much effort. Sure, it’s not for everyone – being such a short hike and all. But it was perfect for Tove and me over Memorial Day weekend. We’re beginners when it comes to backpacking, so Neve Camp was a great place to get our feet wet. Although it’s less than three miles from Colonial Creek Campground (where you park for this backpacking adventure – map), you still feel like you’re out in the wilderness. The path down to Neve Camp is well off the main trail and it sits right along Thunder Creek (the video above shows that it runs more like a river than a creek). There is only room for five tents at Neve Camp, and the designated camping spots are spaced out so it doesn’t feel crowded at all....

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Franklin Ghost Town | A Trip Back in Time

Franklin Ghost Town | A Trip Back in Time

It’s not everyday you get to take a walk back in time, but that’s what happens when you visit Franklin ghost town just outside of Black Diamond. Located 37 miles from downtown Seattle (map), Franklin was a once bustling coal mining town. The community was established in the 1880s (before Washington was even a state), and it survived until mining jobs dried up there in 1919. The land was most recently mined between the late 1940s through 1971. If you’d like to know more about the history of Franklin click here. The most infamous moment happened on August 24, 1894, when 37 workers suffocated in mine fire. It’s still one of the deadliest mine disasters ever in the state of Washington. All that’s left in the area now is Franklin ghost town, which is an overgrown, green hillside with several ruins. There is a parking lot near the site, which costs $5 per vehicle. It’s then a short trek up the hill (past the yellow gate at the end...

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Seattle Whale Watching | Puget Sound Express

Seattle Whale Watching | Puget Sound Express

Whales are truly amazing mammals, and we’re fortunate enough to have them in the Northwest. The only problem is: you rarely get to see them from shore. But spotting these stunning creatures is made much easier on a Seattle whale watching trip with Puget Sound Express. Puget Sound Express launches its Seattle whale watching tours out of Edmonds (they also host whale watching trips out of Port Townsend), which is technically 18 miles from downtown. It’s the only half-day (4-5 hours), guaranteed whale watching trip in Seattle. Yes, you are guaranteed to see whales – or – your next trip is free. Seattle whale watching tours typically take you to the San Juan Islands or through the Straight of Juan de Fuca to find orca, gray, humpback, and/or minke whales, but if you’re extremely lucky – like we were on our tour – you can spot whales right outside of Seattle. On our Seattle whale watching adventure (in early May), we found orca whales no more than 15 minutes...

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Keechelus Lake Snowshoe Trail

Keechelus Lake Snowshoe Trail

When the weather turns cold in the winter, it’s time to head for the hills – er, mountains of Snoqualmie Pass. There’s no shortage of snowy fun just outside of Seattle. Take the Keechelus Lake snowshoe trail for example! I’ll start by saying this: if you’re an experienced winter adventurer, the Keechelus Lake snowshoe trail probably isn’t for you. If you’re just getting started on snowshoes, or you simply want to stomp around in the snow, then this place is perfect. If this sounds like your type of adventure — here is a map to the trailhead. Depending on the driving conditions, it’s about an hour drive from Seattle. The Keechelus Lake snowshoe trail is groomed and it’s mostly flat. It runs along the Iron Horse – John Wayne Pioneer Trail, which was formerly a rail line. There’s an avalanche shoot about two miles into the trail, and that’s where most people recommend you turn around, making it about four miles roundtrip. There’s a mere 200-foot elevation gain along the way, meaning...

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