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Lion Cubs at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle

Lion Cubs at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle

How can you not love these little guys? Meet Tandie, Gandia, and Mandla. They’re the new lion cubs at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. Born on October 24, 2014, the new lion cubs are just getting used to their home at Woodland Park Zoo. They were only brought out on an intermittent basis at first, but now you can see the triplets everyday (weather permitting) from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the zoo’s African Savanna zone. All three lion cubs at Woodland Park Zoo are boys. Tandie means ‘fire’ in one of the languages from the lions’ native range in South Africa, while Gandia means ‘clever,’ and Mandla means ‘power/strength.’ The dad Xerxes and mom Adia round out the happy lion pride. NOTE: Woodland Park Zoo has seen no shortage of lion cubs lately. Do you remember these cubs? They were born in 2013. The three have since been sent to different zoos as part of a lion conservation program. That’s probably what’s going to happen to these...

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Mask that Inspired the Seahawks Logo

Mask that Inspired the Seahawks Logo

In Seattle, the Seahawks are king. That means the Seahawks logo is everywhere you turn– on shirts, hats, flags, cars, and even on the side of buildings. The list goes on and on. That’s why Tim and I headed over to the Burke Museum when we found out the Native American mask that inspired the Seahawks logo is on display. But be warned, it’s only here for a limited time. In the lead-up to the 2014 Super Bowl, the awesome folks at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum started researching the story behind the Seahawks logo. It wasn’t long before they found a black and white picture of a mask that looked nearly identical to the logo.  The Burke Museum published a blog post about their search for the mask that inspired the Seahawks logo, which included the picture they found, writing: “The sweep of the bold painted line around the front of the eyesocket and back of the mouth, the open-ended eyelid lines, and the line of the mouth and beak...

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Best Time to Visit the Ballard Locks

Best Time to Visit the Ballard Locks

There’s no way to pinpoint the best time to visit the Ballard Locks in Seattle, but there are definitely better times to visit the fish ladder than others. The goal is to obviously see migrating salmon when you visit the Ballard Locks. The fish only pass through from the Puget Sound to Lake Union at certain times of the year. Listed below are the best times to visit the Ballard Locks throughout the year, and what species of salmon you’ll likely see during your visit. BEST TIME TO VISIT THE BALLARD LOCKS Chinook (King) — July-November, but the peak time for Chinook salmon at the Ballard Locks is late August. Coho (Silver) — August-November, but the best time for Coho salmon at the Ballard Locks is late September. Sockeye (Red) — June-October, but the peak time for Sockeye salmon at the Ballard Locks is July. Steelhead — November-May, but the best time for Steelhead salmon at the Ballard Locks is late March/early April. Just by looking at the list,...

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Magnolia Pumpkin Patch | Huge Pumpkins in Seattle

Magnolia Pumpkin Patch | Huge Pumpkins in Seattle

Did you know there’s a pumpkin patch in Seattle? No, I’m not talking about the surrounding area like Carnation, Monroe, or Kent. There’s an honest to goodness pumpkin patch right here in the city. You can find it in Magnolia. These aren’t typical pumpkins, either. The pumpkins at the Magnolia pumpkin patch are MASSIVE! We first heard about the Magnolia pumpkin patch on a news story. Naturally, we decided to check it out. You can find the pumpkin patch at 3707 29th Ave. W. (Map); right in the middle of a neighborhood. It’s impossible to miss. The front yard is loaded with huge pumpkins, sky-high corn stalks, and much more. The man behind the Magnolia pumpkin patch is Greg Shaw (aka “The Pumpkin Man”). He grew his first pumpkin in 1970, and he’s grown pumpkins off and on in different parts of Magnolia since then. He’s produced pumpkins in the current location since 2008. People are encouraged to swing by and see the pumpkins anytime for free. There’s even a light...

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Northwest Trek | A Unique Wildlife Park Experience

Northwest Trek | A Unique Wildlife Park Experience

Washington is loaded with amazing wildlife. We have elk, moose, bears, wildcats, and so much more. You can run across these animals on a hiking trail, in your backyard, or just simply find them all at Northwest Trek near Eatonville. Northwest Trek (11610 Trek Dr. E.) is 55 miles south of downtown Seattle, so it takes about an hour and fifteen minutes to drive there (depending on traffic). Northwest Trek is a wildlife park — not just a typical zoo — and you’ll see why when you get there. The 723-acre park includes forest, wetlands, and large meadows. The highlight of Northwest Trek is the 55-minute guided tram tour. The tram takes you through a 435-acre enclosed free-range area of the park. Since it’s free-range, you never know what you’re going to see. My mom and I went recently and saw mountain goats, elk, moose, bison, and bighorn sheep. Several of the animals were in the distance, but a few of them were just a feet away from our tram. You can...

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Bell Street Pier Rooftop Deck in Seattle

Bell Street Pier Rooftop Deck in Seattle

Put yourself in this situation: it’s time for lunch on a beautiful day in Seattle. You packed your meal and you want to enjoy the sunshine. There are a hundred different places you can go around the city: Kerry Park on Queen Anne, Seacrest Park in West Seattle, or how about the Bell Street Pier rooftop deck? It doesn’t share the same hype as other top viewpoints in Seattle, but there’s no reason the Bell Street Pier rooftop deck (2225 Alaskan Way) shouldn’t be included in the conversation. Located on Pier 66 on the Seattle waterfront, the Bell Street Pier rooftop deck offers one of the best views in the heart of the city. I know two different ways to access the Bell Street Pier rooftop deck: You can walk across the Bell Street Pier Pedestrian Bridge from Elliott Avenue (located near the Art Institute of Seattle at 2323 Elliott Ave), or you can take the large staircase (located near the entrance of Anthony’s — click here for a photo) to...

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